olderdating net - Self consolidating cong

The proceeds would not be credited to the Social Security trust funds, as under current law, but to the Medicare Hospital Insurance program, which had a less favorable financial outlook than did Social Security. Insured status is measured in terms of "quarters of coverage." A person who had 1 year of coverage for every 2 years after 1936 and before death or reaching age 65 was fully insured. The Townsend movement, led by a California doctor named Francis E.

However, the same day the Ways and Means Committee reported out H. 5828, a bill making miscellaneous and technical amendments to the Social Security Act, that incorporated most of the provisions that had earlier been approved by the Social Security Subcommittee. This had led to charges that the Social Security trust funds were being "raided" to finance the rest of government and "masking" the true size of the deficit. 3167, Senator Moynihan proposed that the payroll tax rate be scheduled to fall and rise with changes in the program's costs. His budget document said this would "move the treatment of Social Security and railroad retirement Tier I benefits toward that of private pensions" and would generate billion in new tax revenues over 5 years. The PIA was the basic benefit amount for a worker who began receiving benefits at age 65. Benefits can be paid to workers, their dependents or survivors only if the worker is "insured" for these benefits.

Instead, it briefly summarizes discussions on individual major amendments.

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They regarded taxation of benefits as an indirect means test, which would weaken the "earned right" nature of the program, and make it more like welfare, where need determines the level of benefits. On June 18, 1993, by a party-line vote of 11-9, the Finance Committee approved H. 2264, but included the Lautenberg-Exon amendment to raise the taxation thresholds to $32,000 (single) and $42,000 (couple). Many argued that making the agency independent would help insulate it from political and budgetary discussions, would lead to better leadership, and reassure the public about Social Security's long-run survivability. 3136 relating to the earnings test was similar to H. 2684, but modified to slow the rise in the exempt amounts during the first 5 years of the phase-in. Defenders of the provision said that it is a reasonable means of executing the purpose of Social Security. The issue, however, does not appear to have emerged in subsequent Social Security legislation.

Regardless of abstract arguments about tax principles, many recipients regard increased taxation as simply a reduction in the benefits they had been promised. 4277, the Social Security Administrative Reform Act of 1994, on August 15, 1994. Representatives of the Clinton Administration initially opposed making SSA an independent agency, but President Clinton supported H. During congressional budget discussions in the early 1980s proponents of independence wanted to insulate Social Security from benefit cuts designed to meet short term budget goals rather than policy concerns about Social Security. Proponents of providing greater work opportunity argued that incentives for the disabled to attempt to work should be enhanced. Critics said it was unfair and inappropriate to impose a form of "means" test for a retirement benefit that has been earned by a lifetime of contributions to the program, that it has a strong negative effect on work incentives, and that it can hurt elderly individuals who need to work to supplement their Social Security benefits.

The resulting bill reported from the Budget Committee on October 15, H. 5835, extended Social Security coverage to state and local government workers not covered by a retirement plan and raised the maximum amount of earnings subject to HI taxes to $100,000, effective in 1991. The driving force behind the proposal was the growing realization that the rapid rise in Social Security yearly surpluses, caused by payroll tax revenues that exceeded the program's expenditures, were significantly reducing the size of the overall federal budget deficit. 2264, the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993. As part of his plan to cut the Federal fiscal deficit, President Clinton proposed in his first budget that the proportion of benefits subject to taxation should be increased from 50% to 85%, effective in 1994.

As a result of a budget "summit" between congressional and administration leaders, an agreement was reached in which the President would put tax increases on the table and the Congress would consider spending cuts in entitlements, including Social Security and Medicare. 5835 by a vote of 227 (10-R, 217-D) to 203 (163-R, 40-D) During 1990, the debate about Social Security was largely dominated by a proposal by Senator Moynihan (D-NY) to cut the Social Security payroll tax and return the program to true pay-as-you-go financing. 2264: made up to 85% of Social Security benefits subject to the income tax for recipients whose income plus one-half of their benefits exceed $34,000 (single) and $44,000 (couple); and eliminated the maximum taxable earnings base for HI, i.e., subjected all earnings to the HI tax, effective in 1994.

Since its enactment in 1935, Social Security has been amended hundreds of times.

Consequently, this paper is not fully comprehensive. 379-76th Congress, Social Security Amendments of 1939 9 1. For several months budget negotiations stalled, as the democratic majority in Congress disagreed with the administration's position that the deficit should be reduced entirely with spending cuts. Ultimately, however, agreement could not be reached on any form of Social Security constraint, and the conference agreement on the First Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for FY1986, passed on August 1, 1985, did not assume any such savings. During 1986, inflation slowed to a rate that made it unlikely that it would reach the 3% threshold necessary to provide a COLA in that year. , the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, included a measure that would have provided a Social Security COLA in January 1987 no matter how low inflation turned out to be, i.e., it permanently eliminated the 3% requirement. Several of its provisions affected Social Security. The Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee included some of them in a package of Social Security provisions it forwarded to the full committee. This report is intended to respond to the many inquiries that CRS gets for Social Security vote information, which range from requests for general information about legislative action over the years to requests for information about specific floor amendments. Thus, it is intended to be a reference document on the major statutory decisions taken by Congress on the Social Security program. 271-74th Congress, Enactment of the Social Security Act 4 1. Congress that would have raised the threshold by varying amounts. The measure also provided that the threshold would rise in the future, in 0 increments, in proportion to the growth in average wages in the economy (it rose to

Consequently, this paper is not fully comprehensive. 379-76th Congress, Social Security Amendments of 1939 9 1. For several months budget negotiations stalled, as the democratic majority in Congress disagreed with the administration's position that the deficit should be reduced entirely with spending cuts. Ultimately, however, agreement could not be reached on any form of Social Security constraint, and the conference agreement on the First Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for FY1986, passed on August 1, 1985, did not assume any such savings. During 1986, inflation slowed to a rate that made it unlikely that it would reach the 3% threshold necessary to provide a COLA in that year. , the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, included a measure that would have provided a Social Security COLA in January 1987 no matter how low inflation turned out to be, i.e., it permanently eliminated the 3% requirement. Several of its provisions affected Social Security. The Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee included some of them in a package of Social Security provisions it forwarded to the full committee. This report is intended to respond to the many inquiries that CRS gets for Social Security vote information, which range from requests for general information about legislative action over the years to requests for information about specific floor amendments. Thus, it is intended to be a reference document on the major statutory decisions taken by Congress on the Social Security program. 271-74th Congress, Enactment of the Social Security Act 4 1. Congress that would have raised the threshold by varying amounts. The measure also provided that the threshold would rise in the future, in $100 increments, in proportion to the growth in average wages in the economy (it rose to $1,100 in 1998, $1,200 in 2000, and $1,300 in 2001). One of the proposals, the "Senior Citizens Equity Act," included a measure to increase the earnings test limits, for those over age 64, over a period of 5 years, reaching $30,000 in 2000. Although the House approved the measure as part of H. 1215, it was not included in the Balanced Budget Reconciliation bill (H. At that point it would be "actuarial," meaning that the additional benefits a person would receive over his or her lifetime due to the DRC would be approximately equal to the value of the benefits lost due to the earnings test. There is no record of how individual Members voted.

||

Consequently, this paper is not fully comprehensive. 379-76th Congress, Social Security Amendments of 1939 9 1.

For several months budget negotiations stalled, as the democratic majority in Congress disagreed with the administration's position that the deficit should be reduced entirely with spending cuts.

Ultimately, however, agreement could not be reached on any form of Social Security constraint, and the conference agreement on the First Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for FY1986, passed on August 1, 1985, did not assume any such savings. During 1986, inflation slowed to a rate that made it unlikely that it would reach the 3% threshold necessary to provide a COLA in that year. , the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, included a measure that would have provided a Social Security COLA in January 1987 no matter how low inflation turned out to be, i.e., it permanently eliminated the 3% requirement. Several of its provisions affected Social Security. The Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee included some of them in a package of Social Security provisions it forwarded to the full committee.

This report is intended to respond to the many inquiries that CRS gets for Social Security vote information, which range from requests for general information about legislative action over the years to requests for information about specific floor amendments.

Thus, it is intended to be a reference document on the major statutory decisions taken by Congress on the Social Security program. 271-74th Congress, Enactment of the Social Security Act 4 1.

Congress that would have raised the threshold by varying amounts. The measure also provided that the threshold would rise in the future, in $100 increments, in proportion to the growth in average wages in the economy (it rose to $1,100 in 1998, $1,200 in 2000, and $1,300 in 2001). One of the proposals, the "Senior Citizens Equity Act," included a measure to increase the earnings test limits, for those over age 64, over a period of 5 years, reaching $30,000 in 2000. Although the House approved the measure as part of H. 1215, it was not included in the Balanced Budget Reconciliation bill (H. At that point it would be "actuarial," meaning that the additional benefits a person would receive over his or her lifetime due to the DRC would be approximately equal to the value of the benefits lost due to the earnings test. There is no record of how individual Members voted.

||

Consequently, this paper is not fully comprehensive. 379-76th Congress, Social Security Amendments of 1939 9 1.

For several months budget negotiations stalled, as the democratic majority in Congress disagreed with the administration's position that the deficit should be reduced entirely with spending cuts.

Ultimately, however, agreement could not be reached on any form of Social Security constraint, and the conference agreement on the First Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for FY1986, passed on August 1, 1985, did not assume any such savings. During 1986, inflation slowed to a rate that made it unlikely that it would reach the 3% threshold necessary to provide a COLA in that year. , the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, included a measure that would have provided a Social Security COLA in January 1987 no matter how low inflation turned out to be, i.e., it permanently eliminated the 3% requirement. Several of its provisions affected Social Security. The Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee included some of them in a package of Social Security provisions it forwarded to the full committee.

This report is intended to respond to the many inquiries that CRS gets for Social Security vote information, which range from requests for general information about legislative action over the years to requests for information about specific floor amendments.

,100 in 1998,

Consequently, this paper is not fully comprehensive. 379-76th Congress, Social Security Amendments of 1939 9 1. For several months budget negotiations stalled, as the democratic majority in Congress disagreed with the administration's position that the deficit should be reduced entirely with spending cuts. Ultimately, however, agreement could not be reached on any form of Social Security constraint, and the conference agreement on the First Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for FY1986, passed on August 1, 1985, did not assume any such savings. During 1986, inflation slowed to a rate that made it unlikely that it would reach the 3% threshold necessary to provide a COLA in that year. , the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, included a measure that would have provided a Social Security COLA in January 1987 no matter how low inflation turned out to be, i.e., it permanently eliminated the 3% requirement. Several of its provisions affected Social Security. The Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee included some of them in a package of Social Security provisions it forwarded to the full committee. This report is intended to respond to the many inquiries that CRS gets for Social Security vote information, which range from requests for general information about legislative action over the years to requests for information about specific floor amendments. Thus, it is intended to be a reference document on the major statutory decisions taken by Congress on the Social Security program. 271-74th Congress, Enactment of the Social Security Act 4 1. Congress that would have raised the threshold by varying amounts. The measure also provided that the threshold would rise in the future, in $100 increments, in proportion to the growth in average wages in the economy (it rose to $1,100 in 1998, $1,200 in 2000, and $1,300 in 2001). One of the proposals, the "Senior Citizens Equity Act," included a measure to increase the earnings test limits, for those over age 64, over a period of 5 years, reaching $30,000 in 2000. Although the House approved the measure as part of H. 1215, it was not included in the Balanced Budget Reconciliation bill (H. At that point it would be "actuarial," meaning that the additional benefits a person would receive over his or her lifetime due to the DRC would be approximately equal to the value of the benefits lost due to the earnings test. There is no record of how individual Members voted.

||

Consequently, this paper is not fully comprehensive. 379-76th Congress, Social Security Amendments of 1939 9 1.

For several months budget negotiations stalled, as the democratic majority in Congress disagreed with the administration's position that the deficit should be reduced entirely with spending cuts.

Ultimately, however, agreement could not be reached on any form of Social Security constraint, and the conference agreement on the First Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for FY1986, passed on August 1, 1985, did not assume any such savings. During 1986, inflation slowed to a rate that made it unlikely that it would reach the 3% threshold necessary to provide a COLA in that year. , the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, included a measure that would have provided a Social Security COLA in January 1987 no matter how low inflation turned out to be, i.e., it permanently eliminated the 3% requirement. Several of its provisions affected Social Security. The Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee included some of them in a package of Social Security provisions it forwarded to the full committee.

This report is intended to respond to the many inquiries that CRS gets for Social Security vote information, which range from requests for general information about legislative action over the years to requests for information about specific floor amendments.

Thus, it is intended to be a reference document on the major statutory decisions taken by Congress on the Social Security program. 271-74th Congress, Enactment of the Social Security Act 4 1.

Congress that would have raised the threshold by varying amounts. The measure also provided that the threshold would rise in the future, in $100 increments, in proportion to the growth in average wages in the economy (it rose to $1,100 in 1998, $1,200 in 2000, and $1,300 in 2001). One of the proposals, the "Senior Citizens Equity Act," included a measure to increase the earnings test limits, for those over age 64, over a period of 5 years, reaching $30,000 in 2000. Although the House approved the measure as part of H. 1215, it was not included in the Balanced Budget Reconciliation bill (H. At that point it would be "actuarial," meaning that the additional benefits a person would receive over his or her lifetime due to the DRC would be approximately equal to the value of the benefits lost due to the earnings test. There is no record of how individual Members voted.

||

Consequently, this paper is not fully comprehensive. 379-76th Congress, Social Security Amendments of 1939 9 1.

For several months budget negotiations stalled, as the democratic majority in Congress disagreed with the administration's position that the deficit should be reduced entirely with spending cuts.

Ultimately, however, agreement could not be reached on any form of Social Security constraint, and the conference agreement on the First Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for FY1986, passed on August 1, 1985, did not assume any such savings. During 1986, inflation slowed to a rate that made it unlikely that it would reach the 3% threshold necessary to provide a COLA in that year. , the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, included a measure that would have provided a Social Security COLA in January 1987 no matter how low inflation turned out to be, i.e., it permanently eliminated the 3% requirement. Several of its provisions affected Social Security. The Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee included some of them in a package of Social Security provisions it forwarded to the full committee.

This report is intended to respond to the many inquiries that CRS gets for Social Security vote information, which range from requests for general information about legislative action over the years to requests for information about specific floor amendments.

,200 in 2000, and

Consequently, this paper is not fully comprehensive. 379-76th Congress, Social Security Amendments of 1939 9 1. For several months budget negotiations stalled, as the democratic majority in Congress disagreed with the administration's position that the deficit should be reduced entirely with spending cuts. Ultimately, however, agreement could not be reached on any form of Social Security constraint, and the conference agreement on the First Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for FY1986, passed on August 1, 1985, did not assume any such savings. During 1986, inflation slowed to a rate that made it unlikely that it would reach the 3% threshold necessary to provide a COLA in that year. , the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, included a measure that would have provided a Social Security COLA in January 1987 no matter how low inflation turned out to be, i.e., it permanently eliminated the 3% requirement. Several of its provisions affected Social Security. The Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee included some of them in a package of Social Security provisions it forwarded to the full committee. This report is intended to respond to the many inquiries that CRS gets for Social Security vote information, which range from requests for general information about legislative action over the years to requests for information about specific floor amendments. Thus, it is intended to be a reference document on the major statutory decisions taken by Congress on the Social Security program. 271-74th Congress, Enactment of the Social Security Act 4 1. Congress that would have raised the threshold by varying amounts. The measure also provided that the threshold would rise in the future, in $100 increments, in proportion to the growth in average wages in the economy (it rose to $1,100 in 1998, $1,200 in 2000, and $1,300 in 2001). One of the proposals, the "Senior Citizens Equity Act," included a measure to increase the earnings test limits, for those over age 64, over a period of 5 years, reaching $30,000 in 2000. Although the House approved the measure as part of H. 1215, it was not included in the Balanced Budget Reconciliation bill (H. At that point it would be "actuarial," meaning that the additional benefits a person would receive over his or her lifetime due to the DRC would be approximately equal to the value of the benefits lost due to the earnings test. There is no record of how individual Members voted.

||

Consequently, this paper is not fully comprehensive. 379-76th Congress, Social Security Amendments of 1939 9 1.

For several months budget negotiations stalled, as the democratic majority in Congress disagreed with the administration's position that the deficit should be reduced entirely with spending cuts.

Ultimately, however, agreement could not be reached on any form of Social Security constraint, and the conference agreement on the First Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for FY1986, passed on August 1, 1985, did not assume any such savings. During 1986, inflation slowed to a rate that made it unlikely that it would reach the 3% threshold necessary to provide a COLA in that year. , the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, included a measure that would have provided a Social Security COLA in January 1987 no matter how low inflation turned out to be, i.e., it permanently eliminated the 3% requirement. Several of its provisions affected Social Security. The Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee included some of them in a package of Social Security provisions it forwarded to the full committee.

This report is intended to respond to the many inquiries that CRS gets for Social Security vote information, which range from requests for general information about legislative action over the years to requests for information about specific floor amendments.

Thus, it is intended to be a reference document on the major statutory decisions taken by Congress on the Social Security program. 271-74th Congress, Enactment of the Social Security Act 4 1.

Congress that would have raised the threshold by varying amounts. The measure also provided that the threshold would rise in the future, in $100 increments, in proportion to the growth in average wages in the economy (it rose to $1,100 in 1998, $1,200 in 2000, and $1,300 in 2001). One of the proposals, the "Senior Citizens Equity Act," included a measure to increase the earnings test limits, for those over age 64, over a period of 5 years, reaching $30,000 in 2000. Although the House approved the measure as part of H. 1215, it was not included in the Balanced Budget Reconciliation bill (H. At that point it would be "actuarial," meaning that the additional benefits a person would receive over his or her lifetime due to the DRC would be approximately equal to the value of the benefits lost due to the earnings test. There is no record of how individual Members voted.

||

Consequently, this paper is not fully comprehensive. 379-76th Congress, Social Security Amendments of 1939 9 1.

For several months budget negotiations stalled, as the democratic majority in Congress disagreed with the administration's position that the deficit should be reduced entirely with spending cuts.

Ultimately, however, agreement could not be reached on any form of Social Security constraint, and the conference agreement on the First Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for FY1986, passed on August 1, 1985, did not assume any such savings. During 1986, inflation slowed to a rate that made it unlikely that it would reach the 3% threshold necessary to provide a COLA in that year. , the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986, included a measure that would have provided a Social Security COLA in January 1987 no matter how low inflation turned out to be, i.e., it permanently eliminated the 3% requirement. Several of its provisions affected Social Security. The Ways and Means Social Security Subcommittee included some of them in a package of Social Security provisions it forwarded to the full committee.

This report is intended to respond to the many inquiries that CRS gets for Social Security vote information, which range from requests for general information about legislative action over the years to requests for information about specific floor amendments.

,300 in 2001). One of the proposals, the "Senior Citizens Equity Act," included a measure to increase the earnings test limits, for those over age 64, over a period of 5 years, reaching ,000 in 2000. Although the House approved the measure as part of H. 1215, it was not included in the Balanced Budget Reconciliation bill (H. At that point it would be "actuarial," meaning that the additional benefits a person would receive over his or her lifetime due to the DRC would be approximately equal to the value of the benefits lost due to the earnings test. There is no record of how individual Members voted.

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