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Beauvilliers, 1782 "However, the first Parisian restaurant worthy of the name was the one founded by Beauvilliers in 1782 in the Rue de Richelieu, called the Grande Taverne de Londres.

He introduced the novelty of listing the dishes available on a menu and serving them at small individual tables during fixed hours." ---Larousse Gastronomique, (p. France was the birthplace of what we now call the restaurant..happened toward the end of the eighteenth century.

They were highly regulated establishments that sold restaurants (meat based consommes intended to "restore" a person's strength) to people who were not feeling well.

Cook-caterers (traiteurs) also served hungry patrons. The history of these two professions is historically connected and often difficult to distinguish.

The French Revolution launched the modern the restaurant industry.

It relaxed the legal rights of guilds that [since the Middle Ages] were licensed by the king to control specific foods [eg.

Menus, offering dishes individually portioned, priced and prepared to order, were introduced to the public for the first time. This was the first restaurant in the modern sense of the term." ---Larousse Gastronomiqe, completely revised and updated [Clarkson Potter: New York] 1999 (p. Mathurin Roze de Chantoiseau in Paris, 1766 "According to Spang, the forgotten inventor was Mathurin Roze de Chantoiseau, a figure so perfectly emblematic of his time that he almost seems like an invention himself.

The son of a landowner and merchant, Roze moved to Paris in the early 1760s and began floating a variety of schemes he believed would enrich him and his country at the same time."

According to the current edition of Larousse Gastronomque (p.

194-5), the first cafes (generally defined as places selling drinks and snacks) was established in Constantinople in 1550.

Such tavern-restaurants existed not only in France but also in other countries.

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